Khensur Denma Locho Rinpoche’s passing

Denma Locho Rinpoche recently passed away on October 23. He was a former abbot of Namgyal Monastery (the personal monastery of the Dalai Lama). He was also a lineage holder of Ling Rinpoche’s teachings (the senior tutor to the Dalai Lama and former Ganden Tripa, head of the Gelug tradition), and was known to be an expert of Manjushri’s fierce form, Yamantaka.

I’m sure many will be grieving the loss of such a great master. Learn more about his life and some of his recent work here.

Giving Without Hope of a Reward

When being generous with others, whether materially or emotionally, many interesting thoughts can pop up. As Ajahn Brahm mentions, what happens if someone gives, but one doesn’t get appreciation in return? This could cause someone to be reluctant to give again. Why not just be selfish like everyone else?

Ajahn Brahm discusses how to work with such thoughts and to continue the practice of giving.

Passing of Jim Blumenthal

Recently, Jim Blumenthal, Professor of Buddhist Studies at Maitripa College and Associate Professor in the School of History, Philosophy and Religion at Oregon State University, passed away after a one year battle with colon cancer.

It’s interesting to see how many people were affected by his generous work for others, as can bee seen on the memorial page for him on Matripa College.

Venerable Thubten Chodron gave a talk about Jim, and explains that despite all his wordly success (Ph.D professor, and so forth), he was always very humble about his wordly success and his Dharma knowledge. he went about his business with a steady determination. I think Jim’s life is an inspiration for other western practitioners, and is reminder that everyone will have to pass away and that we need to make use of our time now.

Giving Dharma Names to Pets

Yeshe - A cat that Lived at Sravasti Abbey. Yeshe means "Deep/pristine awareness, widsom knowledge"

Yeshe – A cat that Lived at Sravasti Abbey. Yeshe means “Deep/pristine awareness, widsom knowledge”

Giving Dharma names to your pets can be helpful in that it can leave positive imprints in their mind every time their name is spoken. For instance, the first cat to live at Sravasti Abbey was called “Manjushri”, or the Buddha of wisdom. Everytime someone called out to Manjushri, positive imprints were left in his mindstream.

Lama Zopas Advice

In regards to giving Dharma names to pets, Lama Zopa says:

“If you have a pet it is very good to give it a Dharma name rather than giving it a useless name that has no benefit for the animal. If you give your pet a Dharma name, such as names of the path to enlightenment (renunciation, bodhicitta, emptiness – they can be in English, Tibetan or Sanskrit) it leaves a positive imprint on the mind of the animal.”

“If you have a pet it is very good to give it a Dharma name rather than giving it a useless name that has no benefit for the animal. If you give your pet a Dharma name, such as names of the path to enlightenment (renunciation, bodhicitta, emptiness – they can be in English, Tibetan or Sanskrit) it leaves a positive imprint on the mind of the animal.”

Need a Dharma Name? Some Suggestions

To see a list of possible Dharma names for your pets (and the meanings behind the names), click here.

Keeping the Mind and Heart Open

During Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche‘s “Modern Day Bodhisattva Semnar,” he talks about compassion. He points out that some can not keep their minds and hearts open after evaluating a situation and deciding that they can’t help. He explains how the practice of compassion is not about being able to relieve others of suffering immediately, but of trying to stay open.

Related Posts:

More Dzigar Kongtrul Videos…

Supporting a new documentary film with the Karmapa

A new film is being developed called “Thongdral: Liberation through seeing,” which focuses on the sacred arts created by the Karmapa. Here is some information about the Karmapas endorsement of the film:

This theatrical documentary has the active support and guidance of His Holiness Ogyen Trinley Dorje, the 17th Karmapa.The Karmapa is the traditional leader of the Karma Kagyu, one of the major branches of Tibetan Buddhism. The first Karmapa was the original Tibetan master to intentionally take rebirth.

The film is being made by experienced professionals: a producer/director who has made more than 60 documentaries, a Visual Effects producer who has won two Oscars, and talented cinematographers.

View a trailer about the film:

To support this film, click here. The current fundraising campaign has only 3 days left.

21 Taras for Choden Rinpoche

choden_walking

Choden Rinpoche has recently been staying in Taiwan while recovering from illness. Indications are that he is recovering well, and there has been a request for students to recite 21 Taras for his swift recovery. A copy of 21 Taras can be found here. Geshe Gyalten recently said:

 

Dear Students and Benefactors of Rinpoche,

Our Precious Choden Rinpoche has recovered quite well during the past few weeks. Rinpoche is currently receiving Energy-Therapy and Herbal Medicines. His most recent blood tests indicate that there is a vast improvement in his condition. We give our thanks to the Taiwanese disciples, who provided medical care and hospitality to Rinpoche.

Rinpoche remains in good mood and health. He is eating well and regularly exercising by taking his early morning walks. He seems to have more energy and looks much healthier than before!

We request that all the students and Centers recite the “Praises To The 21 Taras”, a million times, from Sept 10th to Friday, Oct 10th, 2014. The prayers should be dedicated to the long lives of H.E. Choden Rinpoche and all of the Gurus of our Lineage so that they may continuously turn the Wheel of Dharma and benefit all sentient beings.

Please submit the Number of Recitations to ADC at: hg_hdr@hotmail.com

With gratitude,
Geshe Gyalten
Taipei, Taiwan

Geshe Sopa Rinpoches Passing

Geshe_Sopa_rinpoche

On August 28th, Geshe Sopa Rinpoche went into clear light at Deer Park Buddhist Center. He is remembered for being instrumental in establishing academic study of Tibetan Buddhism in the west. He was a full time professor at the University of Wisconsin, where mentored many western scholars. He also established Deep Park Buddhist Center, invited His Holiness the Dalai Lama several times to the U.S., and wrote a 5 volume commentary on Tsongkhapa’s Lamrim Chenmo (Steps on the Path to Enlightenment: A Commentary on Tsongkhapa’s Lamrim Chenmo).

I remember being amazed at even at such an advanced age, he could quote and explain detailed passages from Buddhist sutras and commentaries with such ease. These quotations seemed to just fall down like raindrops. Even in his elder years, he seemed many years “sharper” than someone in their 20’s. Most importantly, his kindness to tirelessly spread teachings to the west is something I will remember.

To read more about Geshe Sopa Rinpoche and his passing away, click here.

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